Knowing hunger from the neck down

 

 

By Ed Nicholson

A lot of people know the statistics about hunger.  They sincerely believe something should be done.
They know it in their heads. A lot of people know enough to talk about it.  But they’re not doing anything about it.
They just need to know it from the neck down  to really be motivated to do something.
The people who know the most about how hunger are those who know it in their stomachs.  The people who have actually experienced it in their lifetime. I can’t lay claim to this experience, but some of the most inspiring people I’ve ever met can.
Then there are those who know it in their hearts. They’ve been touched by what they’ve seen up close and personal.  All the statistics, even well-told poignant stories don’t deliver this experience.
Finally there are those who know it in their feet.  They walk the talk.  They get out and do. Most often they’re the quiet, unsung heroes we refer to as Hunger All-Stars.
The solution to end hunger needs people who think and talk.  But it more desperately needs people who feel and walk.  

How can we more effectively move knowledge of hunger from peoples’ heads into their hearts?
 

Photo:  LollyKnit–Creative Commons

5 Replies to “Knowing hunger from the neck down”

  1. Veganonymous

    To wipe out hungar we need a sustainable method to feed the world. The United Nations in a study titled "Livestock’s Long Shadow" … warned that rearing cattle produces more greenhouse gasses that driving cars…

    http://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?newsID=20772&CR1=warning

    We need for the affluent people in the industrialized world to wake up to science and also become HUMANE and adopt a vegan (plant based) diet.

    You can feed a dozen people a plant based diet for less resourses than it takes to feed only one person on the SAD (Standard American Diet) of eating meat.

    Not only would this help stop global warming and feed the world it would also help the 65% of Americans who are obese to lose weight and prevent many illnesses… therefore lowering the cost of medical care.

    Tyson foods know they are exploiting the animals and contributing to people’s illness and the U.S. Pharmaceutical companies need sick people so they can push their drugs and make profits for the investors.

    So why am I wasting my time trying to teach people who were born blind to understand what a rainbow is… when I know this comment will probably be deleted?

    Because unlike Tyson Foods I care.

    Yes I’m a Vegan and haven’t eaten meat in 30 years, and I’m still healthy.

  2. Jeff Wiedner

    Great questions, Ed. This taps into the problem we always have: how do we move from talking about problems to providing solutions. Stop-gap measures like food pantries & soup kitchens are important. But until we can provide not only solutions, but also actionable steps, it will be difficult to actual end this. In general, I think folks "get it," but with all of the noise out there, it’s tricky getting them from them nodding their heads to moving their feet.

  3. Kaitlyn Ytterberg

     Poverty Eradication Day is October 17.

    Here’s how I am celebrating:

    http://www.optinnow.org/quilt

    Opportunity International’s Women’s Opportunity Network is providing a virtual gathering place where you can honor someone special, make a statment, and introduce others to microfinance.

    Write a message on the quilt to declare your commitment to help create a world without poverty. You’ll receive a $25 OptINnow gift card to help fund a loan to an entrepreneur of your choosing at http://www.OptINnow.org. Or, you can buy the patch and write a message in honor of someone special. That person will be sent an email with a link to the quilt and a $25 gift card to be used at http://www.OptINnow.org.

    You’re not just buying a piece of quilt. You’re doing your part to help end global poverty.

  4. Brad Melton

    "…more desperately needs people who feel and walk.  How can we more effectively move knowledge of hunger from peoples’ heads into their hearts?"

    How about we ask them how they feel about a walk?

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