Time for a new and different debate on SNAP


Food stamps.  SNAP.  Hardly anything (possibly excepting healthcare) has polarized public opinion more.  And let me just offer the disclaimer that the rest of what I’m going to say is absolutely my own perspective, not necessarily that of my employer nor my fellow Tyson Team Members..  Because, with the way things are, I’ll likely say something that’s going to aggravate just about everyone.

Recent critics of SNAP have pointed to Jason Greenslate.  He allegedly spends his time on the beach, frequently using his $200 a month SNAP allocation to buy lobster.  Other more mythical examples include the “welfare queen”   and people buying crab legs, liquor and cigarettes with SNAP benefits (the latter, of course illegal).

Then you have another Jason.  Always been a hard worker. Former Afghanistan combat veteran. Now unemployed, but searching for a job.  SNAP recipient.

For every Jason Greenslate, taking advantage of the system, there are a hundred truly hungry veteran Jasons, who desperately need our assistance. Unfortunately far, far too much emphasis is placed on the former, at the expense of the latter.  People do need this program, and kids will go hungry without it.

SNAP advocates, citing the documented low incidence of fraud and abuse in the program, typically refuse to participate in any discussion of reform. Their concern: allowing this discussion gives  the program’s critics more credibility than they deserve. The problem is, fraud and abuse do exist, albeit minor compared to true need.  And by refusing to acknowledge it, advocates create the impression they don’t know, or don’t care that it exists.

So here’s my suggestion:  Let’s fully fund SNAP. Then let’s all acknowledge it’s not perfect, roll up our sleeves, and figure out how to make it better, so that the people who don’t need it don’t get it.   Meanwhile, let’s not let folks truly in need go hungry.

Photo USDAGov–Flickr  Creative Commons