Oh, SNAP…we’re invading food deserts!

About two weeks ago, “Music City” was alive and pumping. Fans from around the world were traveling to Nashville, Tennessee, in droves for the Country Music Awards Music Festival. In the midst of fun and excitement, the everyday hustle for locals carried on.

Unfortunately, that also meant that hunger too, never missed a beat.

According to the USDA Food Research Atlas, 1 in 5 Nashville residents live in a food desert. This type of ‘desert’ is a geographic area where access to affordable, fresh food (such as produce), is not easily accessible.

With this knowledge, we were excited to drive over to the Parthenon Towers across from Centennial Park on Thursday, June 11 where we unveiled a brand new mobile market with our friends from Community Food Advocates. The swanky design of the truck looks similar to a tasty food truck you’d find in any downtown metro area during lunch. However, this renovated vehicle (featured above) was a new concept for The Nashville Mobile Market that doubles their fleet as a result of $35,000 gift through our KNOW Hunger Nashville project with the Urban League of Middle Tennessee.

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This month alone, The Nashville Mobile Market will make 49 stops with 23 different partner agencies. At each stop, local residents have access to nutritious food items, ranging from seasonal fruits like strawberries to veggies such as broccoli, and other pantry staples. Better still, shoppers have the option to purchase food with SNAP dollars.

We may be a meat company, but we know the importance in having access to a well rounded and nutritious meal. The ability to use SNAP benefits at this mobile market means it is one more convenience to help individuals and families facing tough times to stretch their dollar. Nashville Metro Council Members Burkley Allen and Erica Gilmore joined us in making a few remarks indicating the significance of such an expansion.

After children, elderly and disabled individuals are amongst the greatest percentage of SNAP recipients. Therefore, even with a grocery store a bus ride away from Parthenon Towers, many residents at this location are unable to travel due to limited mobility. The words of gratitude that were shared by frequent market patrons were overwhelming and confirmed our belief that helping to make the vision of Community Food Advocates a reality truly makes a difference.

The mobile market reveal was just the start of our trip. We also spent time with two important groups of leaders to talk about food insecurity in Middle Tennessee, and to challenge them.

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The first group included approximately 47 high school students enrolled in the Urban League’s College Readiness program. We emphasized that no one person represents hunger while discussing how food insecurity can affect performance in school and at work. In a classroom-made grocery store scenario, we “aged” two students a few years and challenged them to shop for themselves on a limited budget — similar to an individual who may receive SNAP. With nutrition in mind, both Ashanti and Michael made excellent choices that were balanced in diet, although budgeting was definitely a test. The room of students  was quick to chime in on what better decisions could have been made. In wrapping up the discussion, we encouraged students to be sensitive to others who may silently experience hunger and shared that even at their age. The takeaway was they too can be active in ways to fight hunger.

On Friday, June 12, we closed out the week with our second KNOW Hunger Challenge in Nashville. Our goal was to create awareness about hunger, offer SNAP and nutrition education while debunking myths about the federally funded program and its users. It was an honor to have been invited by the Alpha Delta Omega Chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha, Sorority, Inc., whose organization programs target health promotion, family strengthening and educational enrichment.  In addition to sorority members, the room of community leaders included Tennessee State Representative Brenda Gilmore, Councilwoman Erica Gilmore and Team Members from our Tyson Foods – Shelbyville location.

Competitiveness and camaraderie were in full effect as we sent the teams out on their shopping mission at a nearby grocery store. They were charged with shopping for a hypothetical family of four. Although many participants were longtime shoppers for their own families,  they still found the challenge to be eye-opening.  For example, one of the takeaways noted was the nutritional value in shopping more around the perimeter of the store, where one can find fresh produce, grains, bread, meats and dairy.

The challenge was also an appreciated reminder of the real-life challenge for those participants  whohave had to shop on a budget in the past but who can now shop more freely as they’ve advanced in careers. As we discredited the myth that all SNAP recipients are lifetime beneficiaries, we added that the experience is an opportunity to empathize and educate extended family or friends that may have fallen on tough times.

Speaking of tough times, all food purchased during the challenge was donated our friends at The Nashville Food Project who make it possible for hundreds of Nashvillians facing hardships to have a hot meal every day. Elanco sweetened the pot with an additional $500 gift card donation!

KNOW Hunger Challenge Winning Team

KNOW Hunger Challenge Winning Team

We know that hunger will not end at the SNAP of a finger. The fight against hunger is fought in the everyday battles of more than 110,000 Nashville residents. To overcome, it will take an evolving and committed group of strong individuals, playing different roles but working together as a team to help our neighbors get back on their feet so that our communities can win. We’re so fortunate in this campaign to have found great partners, each of whom in their own way bear arms to take down hunger and its barriers in Middle Tennessee.

 

Stereotypes

Sheri Duncan, a volunteer at the Pinelake Care Center, near Jackson, Miss., says her food pantry serves many elederly people in the area. Mississippi ranks in the top ten states for food insecurity for people 60 and older.

Geraldine is a grandmother. Like many retired people, she and her husband depend on their Social Security checks to get by each month. This can be challenging on its own, but Geraldine has another full-time job, one that doesn’t pay in dollars: caring for her four grandchildren. Geraldine drives an average car, looks neatly dressed, and is proud to share her life story of running a farm. What you wouldn’t guess is that she depends on local food pantry to keep everyone in her household fed. She may not be whom you picture when you think of someone who is food insecure, but she is not alone. Many elderly people are suffering with a bad economy and increased pressures to care for an extended family. Mississippi ranks in the top ten states for food insecurity for people 60 and older.

As part of the Mississippi Hunger Project Nutrition Fairs held yesterday in Vicksburg and today in Jackson, we are interviewing people to gain perspective and insight into hunger in our communities. Working with the National Urban League and the Mississippi Food Network, we are raising awareness of hunger in a state that, ironically, also has a high obesity rate. We have a *lot* of video stories to share, so please check back for updates. And if you are in the Jackson, Miss., area, come on by the Salvation Army Center on Beasley Rd., and learn about hunger stereotypes first hand.

Partnering in Mississippi

Ray Ables, Tyson Foods Mississippi; Donnie Smith, President and CEO, Tyson Foods; Marc Morial, CEO National Urban League

At Tyson Foods, one of the things we’ve been trying to do with our hunger program in recent years is involve our stakeholders wherever possible.  That starts first and foremost with about 100,000 Team Members (employees) across 26 states.  We’ve also worked in activities with customers, vendors, communities, and advocacy groups.

We were excited last week to announce a partnership with the National Urban League and the Urban League of Greater Jackson to work alongside the Mississippi Food Network to address hunger in central Mississippi.

There are huge opportunities to make a difference there.  According to the USDA, Mississippi has the country’s highest level of food insecurity, with more than 19% of the population at risk of hunger.
The National Urban League has a focus on nutrition, and an outstanding affiliate in the Urban League of Greater Jackson. The Mississippi Food Network’s area of coverage comprises most of the state, with a strong focus on central Mississippi.  Tyson Foods has three plants, with more than 4000 team members in central Mississippi.  All of these organizations have strong reasons and ways to collaborate toward making progress.

We’re excited about this partnership.  Stay tuned here for more.