#FoodThanks

FoodProduction_MOplantEvery day I have the honor to work with and around people who make food.  They work hard.  From the farm, to the production plant, to the folks who sell and deliver the food, all the way to the people who perform essential jobs behind desks—they care about what they do and the products they make.   They feed those products to their own families, but they know a lot of other families are enjoying them, too.  I’d really like for the people who disparage big bad companies to meet each and every one of them.
As we pause and reflect on our blessings this week,  I’m thankful there are people who devote their lives to making and serving food, whether they work on a small farm that feeds a few people or one that cultivates thousands of acres; in a local diner or in a national restaurant chain; for an artisinal manufacturer  or a large company that feeds millions. We need them all to feed a hungry world.
I’m hopeful that everyone who wants a meal this Thanksgiving will find one.  And I pray for the day that anyone who needs a meal will have one, every day of the year.
Happy Thanksgiving to you and yours.

Now Let Us Give Thanks #FoodThanks

For the third year in a row, the AgChat Foundation is leading an effort to generate awareness and gratitude for those who put food on our tables.  If you’d like to learn more about it, go over to #FoodThanks. Here’s my post from the first year. I think it’s still relevant:

I’m one of the lucky ones. I have a tremendous family, good health, and live in the best country in the world. Lots for which to be thankful. I also have one of the best jobs in the world. Every day, my job reminds me of how thankful I should be. You see, neither I nor any of my family has ever gone hungry.

While I stand on a high hill watching people being fed, I also get to look in another direction and get a panoramic view of food being grown, produced and taken to market. Because I know how many people and how much work is involved in that process, it’s easy for me to be grateful for the Thanksgiving meal I’ll share with my family this year.

I’m thankful for the farmers, no matter their size and production techniques. Without them, none of us would be fed. Farming’s hard work that takes a commitment that goes way beyond that of simply making a living.

I’m thankful for the people who pick up, process and deliver food to market. Also hard work, often with very thin margins, and certainly no guarantees of success. Some of them are my own teammates, so I get to see up close and personal how passionate they are about feeding people. I’m humbled and honored to be able to share the products of their hard work.

I’m thankful for people in grocery stores, farmer’s markets, restaurants, institutional kitchens, food banks, food pantries, soup kitchens—anywhere food is conveyed to those of us who will consume it.

I’m thankful that we live in a country that produces a bounty of food. I’m hopeful we’ll continue to explore new ways that bounty can be shared among those who don’t have enough. I’m also hopeful that any changes we make in the way we produce food will allow us to continue to feed our country, in addition to many across the globe.

Now let us give thanks.

FoodThanks

 Thanksgiving
Eat. Enjoy.
Someone grew our food–no matter what we’re eating.
Someone took time and energy to get it to market–no matter how much or how little it was processed.
Someone prepared it for the table–whether it’s someone we love or someone we’ll never see.
Be thankful for all of these people.  And that we live in a country where we can eat and enjoy.
We’re especially thankful this year and every year for those who grow, prepare and deliver food to those among us who need it most.  You do incredibly noble work for all too little thanks.
From all of us at Tyson Foods to all of you–Happy Thanksgiving. 

#foodthanks

photo by kimberlykv Flickr Creative Commons
 
 

Now Let Us Give Thanks

By Ed Nicholson

I’m one of the lucky ones. I have a tremendous family, good health, and live in the best country in the world. Lots for which to be thankful. I also have one of the best jobs in the world. Every day, my job reminds me of how thankful I should be. You see, neither I nor any of my family has ever gone hungry.

While I stand on a high hill watching people being fed, I also get to look in another direction and get a panoramic view of food being grown, produced and taken to market. Because I know how many people and how much work is involved in that process, it’s easy for me to be grateful for the Thanksgiving meal I’ll share with my family this year.

I’m thankful for the farmers, no matter their size and production techniques. Without them, none of us would be fed. Farming’s hard work that takes a commitment that goes way beyond that of simply making a living.

I’m thankful for the people who pick up, process and deliver food to market. Also hard work, often with very thin margins, and certainly no guarantees of success. Some of them are my own teammates, so I get to see up close and personal how passionate they are about feeding people. I’m humbled and honored to be able to share the products of their hard work.

I’m thankful for people in grocery stores, farmer’s markets, restaurants, institutional kitchens, food banks, food pantries, soup kitchens—anywhere food is conveyed to those of us who will consume it.

I’m thankful that we live in a country that produces a bounty of food. I’m hopeful we’ll continue to explore new ways that bounty can be shared among those who don’t have enough. I’m also hopeful that any changes we make in the way we produce food will allow us to continue to feed our country, in addition to many across the globe.

This week, we’re joining hundreds in support of the AgChat Foundation’s #foodthanks effort to give credit to all those who help bring meals to our table year-round. You can join the effort by using your blog, Twitter or Facebook account tomorrow with the #foodthanks hashtag. Find out more by visiting http://foodthanks.com/

Now let us give thanks.